To Lucinda, Whoever You Were

KEN8 (2)

 

What I know of you for certain is only what’s recorded on your tombstone
and two grainy old photographs. Certainly, you were once a girl. A wife.
A mother. You were a survivor of interesting times. Of Huguenot stock.
You knew duty. Did you know love? Did you know peace?
You were the family nurse, then a widow, a “Relict”, they said for decades.
The custom then, it sounds harsh today: Relict. But do we judge you unfairly?

You were a hard woman for hard times and kept a Bible cocked and loaded.
You weren’t afraid to use it. It was your preferred weapon.
Two of five children quickly fled when they could. A darling little girl
died as an infant. How you mourned. A son went insane, locked up forever.
One last daughter, a constant companion to the end, disappeared
without a trace. Are there really two people in your grave?

Your grudges piled up, un-dismissed for a lifetime. Cloying sweetness
masked failed manipulation. Did you feel unloved?
I think you were loved in spite of yourself. Your son fled to
marry an Irish “Papist” …oh the tears…oh the horror!
With hope in his heart, he gave his daughter your name -- Lucinda:

— Illumination —

and she lived up to the name in ways you could never comprehend.

 

Comments 2

 
Rosy Cole on Saturday, 24 June 2017 12:15

Love this. Brimful of poignancy and humanity.

Love this. Brimful of poignancy and humanity.
Ken Hartke on Saturday, 24 June 2017 15:30

Thanks, Rosie. She has been gone 100 years but is still a presence.

Thanks, Rosie. She has been gone 100 years but is still a presence.
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