A Brief Brexit Daydream

Artist Name - A-Brief-Brexit-Daydream-12.33pm---Friday-19th-April-2019-1.m4a
As I sit here in a greenish part of London overlooking the Thames, I ponder on the Magical Lost Kingdom of Brexit Forever/Never Never Land as it continues on its unending spiral of self-flagelation, I find my mind drifting back nearly 50 years ago and recall with a smile idyllic family summer holidays spent on the alluring rugged beauty of the Donegal coastline in the far-flung north-west of Ireland. Brexit fades from my consciousness and I can hear the wild Atlantic Ocean breaking on the shore, sea birds are flying overhead and the sunlight dances on my deserted sandy beach that stretches for miles and miles and miles. I remember James Joyce at this point when he pondered, 'Am I walking into eternity along Sandymount Strand?'

Happy Easter 

Comments 3

 
Rosy Cole on Saturday, 27 April 2019 15:23

In transporting landscapes, I have sometimes had the same thought as the one you cite here by James Joyce. Have to confess, though, to failing to persevere with his books. Despite that, I do enjoy, and am inspired by, stream-of-consciousness writing. It liberates creative energy.

Thanks for this breath of air.

In transporting landscapes, I have sometimes had the same thought as the one you cite here by James Joyce. Have to confess, though, to failing to persevere with his books. Despite that, I do enjoy, and am inspired by, stream-of-consciousness writing. It liberates creative energy. Thanks for this breath of air.
Nicholas Mackey on Sunday, 28 April 2019 14:58

Rosy you are a gem to comment in the way that you kindly did as I needed something, anything to help me escape the 'doom-burdened caravel' that is the rudderless ghost ship called, Brexit as it careers alarmingly through storm-tossed seas hellbent on striking a course with no compass to hand that will shortly propel this ill-fated vessel to pitiless destruction on the rocky shores of a nation called Brexitana where the good people of that kingdom have been betrayed by the negligent, selfish and short-sighted leadership of this 'green and pleasant land'.

Ah, stream of consciousness writing can be a pleasure or a pain depending on your literary tastes where exponents of this type of writing are numerous but let me pick out a few that have made an impression on me: Michel de Montaigne, Virginia Woolf and Naguib Mahfouz.
Montaigne's writing, in the form of essays from the 16th century was, in a way, a diary of his life, as I'm sure you know, his thoughts and impressions of what he saw and experienced at the time some 500 years ago. As a teenager reading a tome of his essays (given to me by my father to whom I will always be grateful for this kindness) brought home to me the freshness of good writing that effortlessly transcends time, place and social mores.
Virginia Woolf in her book, 'To The Lighthouse' is a novel that could be termed a book that thrives on stream of consciousness writing where the author's sentences are lengthy with punctuation absent as Ms Woolf tries to cram in as much as possible into the experience of 'the moment'. As a young man, I remember being swept up in the magic of the way she presented her mental direction of travel not only with such authorial panache but which also had the air of confessional truth about it.
Egyptian writer, Naguib Mahfouz said that he was influenced by James Joyce's stream of consciousness technique and some observers have said that Mahfouz has used it to better effect rendering his work more readable.
Ulysses is a book I have struggled with on the several occasions I have attempted to read it and in that I would agree with you, Rosy.
However, in a throwback to the ancient celtic practice of preserving literary treasures down the ages through the development of prodigious memories to facilitate the (vocal) telling and retelling of ancient myths, Joyce has, I feel, taken this on board so that when you hear an audio recording of his book, it springs to life and all the creative nourishment that lies dormant in the silent words upon the page is resurrected and the whole thing pulsates with an energy that will percolate right through to your inner psyche.
I appreciate your kind words, Rosy and also for the good work that you do in continuing to maintain Green Room, this safe haven for scribblers like me who are always searching, searching and searching.

Rosy you are a gem to comment in the way that you kindly did as I needed something, anything to help me escape the 'doom-burdened caravel' that is the rudderless ghost ship called, Brexit as it careers alarmingly through storm-tossed seas hellbent on striking a course with no compass to hand that will shortly propel this ill-fated vessel to pitiless destruction on the rocky shores of a nation called Brexitana where the good people of that kingdom have been betrayed by the negligent, selfish and short-sighted leadership of this 'green and pleasant land'. Ah, stream of consciousness writing can be a pleasure or a pain depending on your literary tastes where exponents of this type of writing are numerous but let me pick out a few that have made an impression on me: Michel de Montaigne, Virginia Woolf and Naguib Mahfouz. Montaigne's writing, in the form of essays from the 16th century was, in a way, a diary of his life, as I'm sure you know, his thoughts and impressions of what he saw and experienced at the time some 500 years ago. As a teenager reading a tome of his essays (given to me by my father to whom I will always be grateful for this kindness) brought home to me the freshness of good writing that effortlessly transcends time, place and social mores. Virginia Woolf in her book, 'To The Lighthouse' is a novel that could be termed a book that thrives on stream of consciousness writing where the author's sentences are lengthy with punctuation absent as Ms Woolf tries to cram in as much as possible into the experience of 'the moment'. As a young man, I remember being swept up in the magic of the way she presented her mental direction of travel not only with such authorial panache but which also had the air of confessional truth about it. Egyptian writer, Naguib Mahfouz said that he was influenced by James Joyce's stream of consciousness technique and some observers have said that Mahfouz has used it to better effect rendering his work more readable. [i]Ulysses[/i] is a book I have struggled with on the several occasions I have attempted to read it and in that I would agree with you, Rosy. However, in a throwback to the ancient celtic practice of preserving literary treasures down the ages through the development of prodigious memories to facilitate the (vocal) telling and retelling of ancient myths, Joyce has, I feel, taken this on board so that when you hear an audio recording of his book, it springs to life and all the creative nourishment that lies dormant in the silent words upon the page is resurrected and the whole thing pulsates with an energy that will percolate right through to your inner psyche. I appreciate your kind words, Rosy and also for the good work that you do in continuing to maintain Green Room, this safe haven for scribblers like me who are always searching, searching and searching.
Rosy Cole on Saturday, 04 May 2019 16:13

Thank you, Nicholas :-) The point about vocal telling of stories is important and interesting. Our early ancestors - and even those only a few generations back - needed no crosswords to keep their brains active and stimulate memory. I've long believed that one secret to good storytelling is to listen for the spoken tale first. Dialogue and conversation (not necessarily quite the same thing) crucially need to be rehearsed. Rhythm is key to everything and can easily get lost in written narrative.

Thank you, Nicholas :-) The point about vocal telling of stories is important and interesting. Our early ancestors - and even those only a few generations back - needed no crosswords to keep their brains active and stimulate memory. I've long believed that one secret to good storytelling is to listen for the spoken tale first. Dialogue and conversation (not necessarily quite the same thing) crucially need to be [i]rehearsed[/i]. Rhythm is key to everything and can easily get lost in written narrative.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Sunday, 22 September 2019

Captcha Image

Writing For Life

We are a small, friendly community who value writing as a tool for developing a brighter understanding of the world and humanity. We share our passions and experiences with one another and with a public readership. ‘Guest’ comments are welcome. No login is required. In Social Media we are happy to include interesting articles by other writers on any of the themes below. Enjoy!


Latest Blogs

    My thoughts are hazy. Sleep last night was interrupted.   A premonition of sorts? Maybe just a reminder of what needs to be done.   They...
"What do you mean, it's wrong? In ethics we learned that the truth is always subjective!" There can be no doubt that the teaching of correct wri...
In the South of France. Second time around, the love gets stronger! Thousands of miles away, her mind is able to switch off from reality. Her hear...
  Struggling to break free from a toxic work life,  I've forgotten what a quiet moment sounds like and feels like. Staring at the window and watchi...
The crescent of a new moon is slowly emerging through the darkening sky.  A pale silver at first, now with a bright, almost golden glow.  A waxing n...

Latest Comments

Virginia M Macasaet Clarity
21 September 2019
In this age of technology, the workplace has become cold and robotic. At my middle age, I struggle ...
Rosy Cole Smitten!
14 September 2019
But who is she? :-)
Katherine Gregor New Moon, New Month
09 September 2019
I'll bear that in mind for next year :–)
Rosy Cole New Moon, New Month
06 September 2019
As every gardener knows, it's always best to plant your beans and flowers on the premier side of the...
Rosy Cole Clarity
06 September 2019
It seems that the 'toxicity' of the workplace is almost universal now. It was never more important t...